Banner

Ballot Initiatives

Statewide Initiatives

Prop 1: Housing Programs and Veterans' Loans Bond

$4 billion in general obligation bonds for housing-related programs, loans, grants and projects and housing loans for veterans

NO

Argument: The SDLP stands in opposition to burdening current and future tax-payers with vague obligations which guarantee future tax increases. Additionally, the majority of the issues that this initiative claims to be aimed at solving, could be solved by pirvate business owners due to demand if government bodies got out of the way.

Prop 2: Use Millionaire's Tax Revenue for Homelessness Prevention Housing Bonds Measure

Authorizes the state to use revenue from Proposition 63 (2004)—a 1 percent tax on income above $1 million for mental health services—on $2 billion in revenue bonds for homelessness prevention housing for persons in need of mental health services.

YES

Argument: Understanding that the taxes have already been collected, the SDLP is in favor of making more clear the dedicated expenditures of the already collected funds.

Prop 3: California Water Infrastructure and Watershed Conservation Bond Initiative

Authorize $8.877 billion in general obligation bonds for water infrastructure, groundwater supplies and storage, surface water storage and dam repairs, watershed and fisheries improvements, and habitat protection and restoration.

NO

Argument: The SDLP stands in opposition to burdening current and future tax-payers with vague obligations which guarantee future tax increases. Additionally, the majority of the issues that this initiative claims to be aimed at solving, could be solved by pirvate business owners due to demand if government bodies got out of the way.

Prop 4: Children's Hospital Bonds Initiative

Authorizes $1.5 billion in bonds for the construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of children's hospitals in California.

NO

Argument: The SDLP stands in opposition to burdening current and future tax-payers with vague obligations which guarantee future tax increases. Additionally, the majority of the issues that this initiative claims to be aimed at solving, could be solved by pirvate business owners due to demand if government bodies got out of the way.

Prop 5: Property Tax Transfer Initiative

Amends Proposition 13 (1978) to allow homebuyers who are age 55 or older or severely disabled to transfer their tax assessments, with a possible adjustment, from their prior home to their new home, no matter (a) the new home's market value; (b) the new home's location in the state; or (c) the buyer's number of moves.

YES

Argument: The SDLP is in favor of initiatives which help to relieve the tax burden on any citizens. Additionally, this initiative should enable more houses to enter the market, thereby reducing housing prices and beginning to alleviate the housing crisis.

Prop 6: Voter Approval for Future Gas and Vehicle Taxes and 2017 Tax Repeal Initiative

Repeals fuel tax increases and vehicle fees that were enacted in 2017, including the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (RRAA) and requires voter approval (via ballot propositions) for the California State Legislature to impose, increase, or extend fuel taxes or vehicle fees in the future.

YES

Argument: The SDLP is in favor initiatives which help to relieve the tax burden on any citizens. Additionally, the gas tax impacts the poorest citizens the most.

Prop 7: Permanent Daylight Saving Time Measure

Allows the California State Legislature to establish permanent, year-round daylight saving time (DST) in California by a two-thirds vote if federal law is changed to allow for permanent DST.

No Position

Argument: Nothing happens even if this passes, so we shouldn't be passing useless laws.

Prop 8: Limits on Dialysis Clinics' Revenue and Required Refunds Initiative

Requires dialysis clinics to issue refunds to patients or patients' payers for revenue above 115 percent of the the costs of direct patient care and healthcare improvements.

NO

Argument: The SDLP is opposed to price control measures, which generally lead to shortages and rationing.

Prop 9: Three States Initiative

Task the state with petitioning Congress to divide the state of California into three states: California, Northern California, and Southern California.

Argument: Unfortunately this initiative was removed from the ballot.

Prop 10: Local Rent Control Initiative

Allows local governments to adopt rent control, repealing the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act.

NO

Argument: The SDLP is opposed to price control measures, which generally lead to shortages and rationing. This is likely to worsen the housing crisis. The majority of economists agree that rent controls hurt the very people they are aimed at helping.

Prop 11: Ambulance Employees Paid On-Call Breaks, Training, and Mental Health Services Initiative

Allows ambulance providers to require workers to remain on-call during breaks paid at their regular rate; Requires employers to provide additional training for EMTs and paramedics; and Requires employers to provide EMTs and paramedics with some paid mental health services.

NO

Argument: The SDLP is opposed to government imposition into the voluntary agreements made between employers and employees. The state should not be mandating requirements of either employers or employees, which this measure would do.

Prop 12: Farm Animal Confinement Initiative

Bans the sale of meat and eggs from calves raised for veal, breeding pigs, and egg-laying hens confined in areas below a specific number of square feet.

NO

Argument: Current laws in effect are sufficient for the purposes espoused in this initiative. We don't need more laws.

San Diego County Initiatives

Measure A: San Diego County Charter Amendments

Amends the county charter to (1) bring election timelines into state and federal compliance for mailing military and overseas ballots and (2) recognize the fire authority as an organizational unit under the chief administrative officer.

No Position

Argument: No Position

Measure B: San Diego County Board of Supervisors Representation of Unincorporated Areas

Amends the county charter to direct a redistricting committee to continue including unincorporated land in three of the five representative districts, with two districts including land permanently outside incorporated areas.

No Position

Argument: No Position

Measure C: San Diego County Pension Stabilization Funds Charter Amendment

Amends the county charter to require that pension stabilization funds be used for pension-related liabilities only and prohibiting using long-term obligations to finance existing operations or needs.

YES

Argument: Yes, if you're going to put money in a pension, the money should stay in the pension.

Measure D: San Diego County General Election Consolidation Initiative

Requires elections for county elective offices to be held at a general election and adopting local regulations for write-in candidates.

NO

Argument: Stop messing with election systems just because you can. You don't get to rerun elections until you get the answer you want.

Measure E: San Diego Mission Vally Stadium Lease an Redevelopment Initiative

Authorizes the city to privately lease the Mission Valley Stadium property and former San Diego Chargers practice facility for at least 99 years, allowing the current stadium to be demolished, and authorizing the construction of a new stadium.

NO

Argument: No. They should sell the property off at market rate.

Measure G: San Diego Mission Valley Stadium Sale to San Diego State University

Authorizes the sale of 132 acres of Mission Valley Stadium to San Diego State University.

NO

Argument: No. They should sell the property off at market rate.

Measure H: San Diego Term Limits for School Board Members

Enacts term limits of three four-year terms for school board members, beginning at the 2020 general election without counting prior terms.

No Position

Argument: Term limits do have some downsides, but for those comfortable with limiting the term of your representative, then vote your conscious.

Measure J: San Diego Business Interests Disclosure Charter Amendment

Requires individuals to disclose their names and identities when they have financial interests in business contracts with the city that exceed 10 percent of the contract or when they have more than a 10 percent owner interest. The measure was designed to exempt public agencies and publicly traded companies.

YES

Argument: Yes, transparency is a good thing.

Measure K: San Diego Term Limits fo City Council Members

Enacts term limits of two four-year terms for city council members.

No Position

Argument: Term limits do have some downsides, but for those comfortable with limiting the term of your representative, then vote your conscious.

Measure L: San Diego Restrictions on City Salaries, Campaigns, and Benefits

This measure would actually raise the salaries of officials, by increasing them to the salary of the highest paid officials in the state.

NO

Argument: No, they don't need a pay raise.

Measure M: San Diego Audit Committee Appointment Charter Amendment

Allows the city council to waive a requirement to consider at least two applicants for appointment as a public member of the audit committee when the council wishes to reappoint a sitting public member who is eligible for another term.

NO

Argument: This is an opportunity rife for corruption and nepotism. A no vote.

Measure N: San Diego Reinstatement of Industrial Disability Benefit Police

Reinstates an industrial disability retirement benefit for members of the San Diego Police Officers Association who experience a violent attack at work resulting in bodily harm and a mental or nervous disorder that disables them from their duties.

NO

Argument: These pension benefits are a never-ending money pit boondogle. No

Measure O: Otay Mesa Enhanced Infrastructure Financing District Tax Increment Bonds

NO

Argument: The SDLP stands in opposition to burdening current and future tax-payers with vague obligations which guarantee future tax increases.

Measure P: Del Mar Land Use and Zoning Charter Amendment

Amends the city charter to establish maximum local control over land use and zoning.

YES

Argument: This puts limits on local governments. The SDLP is in favor of limited government.

Measure Q: Chula Vista Marijuana Business Tax

Authorizes the city to tax marijuana businesses at the following rates: 5 to 15 percent of gross receipts or $5 to $25 per square foot for cultivation.

YES

Argument: No new taxes.

Measure R: Del Mar Beachfront Property Development Regulations Amendment

Reduces development potential for beachfront properties located in the Beach Overlay Zone if parcels extend beyond the Shoreline Protection Area established by the Beach Protection Initiative.

NO

Argument: No, this restricts the freedoms of property owners.

Measure S: Santee School District Bond Issue

NO

Argument: The SDLP stands in opposition to burdening current and future tax-payers with vague obligations which guarantee future tax increases.

Measure T: Del Mar 941 Camino Del Mar Specific Plan Adoption

Replaces the Garden Del Mar Specific Plan with the 941 Camino Del Mar Specific Plan for redevelopment of the former gas station site.

YES

Argument: These plans should only even need to be put up for vote if they impose externalities to local communities. The owners of land should be allowed to build what they see fit.

Measure U: Encinitas Housing Plan Update

Replaces the 1992 housing element in the general plan and adopting the Housing Plan Update 2018.

YES

Argument: These plans should only even need to be put up for vote if they impose externalities to local communities. The owners of land should be allowed to build what they see fit.

Measure V: La Mesa Marijuana Business Tax

Authorizes the city to tax marijuana businesses at rates of up to 6 percent of gross receipts and up to $10 per square foot of cultivation.

NO

Argument: No new taxes.

Measure W: National City Rent Control

Enacts rent control in National City, including the establishment of just cause eviction regulations, rent stabilization, and a rent board.

NO

Argument: Rent control is price control. Price controls don't work are a violation of freedom. Just say no to rent control.

Measure X: Oceanside General Sales Tax

Authorizes the city to enact a 0.5 percent sales tax for seven years to fund general city purposes.

NO

Argument: No new taxes.

Measure Y: Oceanside Voter Approval for Changes to Open Space and Agricultural Land

Requires majority voter approval for any application to change the general plan land use designation or zoning of land designated or zoned for agricultural use or open space. The measure was designed to be in effect through 2028.

NO

Arguments: No, this provides a new avenue for NIMBYism.

Measure Z: Vista Retail Medical Marijuana Sales and Tax Initiative

Authorizes retail sales of medical marijuana for up to 11 retailers and enacting a tax of 7 percent of gross receipts.

NO

Argument: No new taxes.

Measure AA: Vista City Council Marijuana Business Tax Measure

Authorizes the city to tax marijuana businesses at the following rates: $14 per square foot; up to 8 percent on manufacturing and distribution; up to 10 percent on medicinal retail; up to 12 percent on adult-use retail; and up to 3.5 percent on testing.

NO

Arguments: No new taxes

Measure BB: Vista Medical Marijuana Delivery Retail Authorization

Allows up to three delivery-only medical marijuana retailers and two testing facilities in the city.

NO

Argument: Putting limits on numbers of businesses enables corruption and monopolies/cartels.

Measure CC: Southwest Community College District Term Limits for Governing Board Members

Limits the members of the governing board to three terms in office.

No Position

Argument: Term limits do have some downsides, but for those comfortable with limiting the term of your representative, then vote your conscious.

Remaining

NO

The remaining measures are bond and tax issues which should be opposed.